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Author Topic: Sekalaisia screenshotteja..  (Read 546205 times)
Mikko Kärkkäinen
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Posts: 1179
Date Registered: 11.12.11

Re: Sekalaisia screenshotteja..
« Reply #4040 on: 14.06.18, 14:15 »

Pari yöräpsyä.






Mikko Kärkkäinen
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Posts: 1179
Date Registered: 11.12.11

Re: Sekalaisia screenshotteja..
« Reply #4041 on: Yesterday at 09:21:09 »

Pitkästä aikaa Mersulla. Tää on kyllä mukavan haastava kone. En osaa vieläkään 2 pisteen lentoonlähtöä.  Embarrassed




Mikko Kärkkäinen
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Date Registered: 11.12.11

Re: Sekalaisia screenshotteja..
« Reply #4042 on: Yesterday at 14:18:52 »

En osaa vieläkään 2 pisteen lentoonlähtöä.  Embarrassed
No nyt onnistuu sekin! Kokeilin aivan uutta lähetymistä lentoonlähtöön ja otin vertailukohdaksi Spitin. Kun ei koske tikkuun lainkaan, kone lentää itsensä kiitotieltä.  Smiley
Pekka Holopainen
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Date Registered: 14.12.05

Re: Sekalaisia screenshotteja..
« Reply #4043 on: Yesterday at 14:39:35 »

Kampeaako vasemmalle lentoonlähdössä kuten esikuvansa Mersu todellisuudessa? FSXssäkin (astukset tapissa) pitää antaa oikeaa jalkaa reilusti lähdössä eikä saa nostaa väkisin ilmaan ellei halua sen lähtevän käsistä (Flight Replican K-malli).


"Olen eri mieltä kanssasi, mutta taistelen loppuun asti oikeudestasi olla toista mieltä" - Voltaire
Mikko Kärkkäinen
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Posts: 1179
Date Registered: 11.12.11

Re: Sekalaisia screenshotteja..
« Reply #4044 on: Yesterday at 14:43:12 »

Kampeaako vasemmalle lentoonlähdössä kuten esikuvansa Mersu todellisuudessa? FSXssäkin (astukset tapissa) pitää antaa oikeaa jalkaa reilusti lähdössä eikä saa nostaa väkisin ilmaan ellei halua sen lähtevän käsistä (Flight Replican K-malli).
Mulla on tuo Flight Replican malli. Nyt puhutaan niin eri luokan mallinnoksista, että nää ei ole edes samasta galaxista (vertailukohdiksi vaikka Abacuksen Superhornetti vs. VRS:n vastaava)! Cheesy Joo, pitää todella antaa koko oikea jalka ja ehkä vähän jarrujakin. Tai sitten pitää ohjaussauvaa alhaalla oikealla, niinkuin oikeat pilotit teki, mutta se on haastavaa...
Mikko Kärkkäinen
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Date Registered: 11.12.11

Re: Sekalaisia screenshotteja..
« Reply #4045 on: Yesterday at 14:55:07 »

Ja täytyy vielä sanoa, että nää DCS:n WWII-räpistimet ovat haastavuudessaan ihan eri sfääreissä kuin vaikka IL-2-pelisarjan arcadelennokit saati sitten FSXn vastaavat. Alla pätkä yhdestä ED-foorumin ketjusta. On vähän pitkä, tiedän, mutta sisältää paljon hyvää matskua miksi kannuspyöräkoneet ovat hankalia, ja miksi DCS mallintaa niitä haasteita parhaiten.

Koko teksti luettavissa linkin takaa. Suosittelen!  thmbup
https://forums.eagle.ru/showthread.php?t=179253

Quote
Is it more difficult in DCS than in the real world?

For those who doubt the validity of how DCS TW aircraft behave, and the difficulties they simulate, I can say with some authority that they are pretty much spot on. Therefore, the problems being described on these forums are also very much representative of the real world. The thing that sets DCS apart from other PC based simulations, and a number of commercial simulators, both leisure and certified which I have experienced, is that so many of these factors deemed undesirable in the real world, are faithfully modelled, along with the challenges they bring.

I have read a number of contributions which ask the following question:
“Is it more difficult in a fixed base simulation such as DCS because you can’t “feel” the physical movement of the aircraft?” Well, you may find it surprising but my answer to this is a fairly emphatic “NOT REALLY!”, and here’s why…

As we’re talking about the specific difficulties associated directional control on the ground with tailwheeled aircraft here, a very significant factor comes into play. According to what I’ve described previously, the only ideal response to a directional deviation is to counter it either prior to, or, immediately in response to its initiation. At this stage, there is so little lateral acceleration as to be usefully perceptible through the “seat of the pants”. In real life, if you’re responding to that said lateral movement at the point where you can really feel it, you’re way behind. This is particularly the case because in the real world, where those sensations are also being combined with other movement sensations from the airframe, ground and air, which can have the effect of masking or even confusing what you are feeling, especially in lighter weight aircraft.

Of course, if you ARE responding that late to a swing, however successfully or otherwise, the fact is that the deviation in question is now easily perceptible visually, regardless of how much you can actually feel it. Therefore, in a fixed base simulator, your eyes have already told you something needs your attention, provided, that is, you’re looking in the right place!
This is especially true if you’re lucky enough to be flying in VR. The added depth perception and more lifelike peripheral visual cues are more than adequate to detect movements as they develop. But remember, the most important thing is to be ahead of the aircraft before it deviates that far. Of course, there are many other differences in the experiences that both real life and simulation can offer but my belief is that most of those differences are not so fundamentally influential in the context of this subject, though some may be more so in other aspects of flying. One other obvious difference is control force and feedback, though in the phase of flight we’re talking about here, the feedback element is less useful and the force element can be “tuned out” to a great extent by using control curves.

I can’t emphasise this enough. You need to “dance” on the pedals… Like you’re tiptoeing over hot coals in bare feet. Trying to make the tiniest, quickest movements you can before getting your foot off again. Most pilots new to tailwheel aircraft, particularly those with extensive tricycle experience (which probably accounts for most people here) are programmed for making long smooth pedal inputs during the ground roll. This I liken more to wading through deep mud in wellies, rather than dancing on hot coals! It simply won’t work, though your instincts may be very persuasive in telling you otherwise. After all, it’s what you’re used to! I can’t explain just how you reach the point where you instinctively know what’s coming in time to make these tiny, fast and decisive inputs. I can say however, that if you practice the correct technique, with the right mind-set and an understanding of what is happening, you’ll get it eventually, but for most humans it will take a lot longer than learning to control a tricycle. It’s simply a very different type of learning, both physically and mentally.

In summary, here are a few pointers:

1.   There are an almost infinite number of things which will cause a swing. Engine torque, asymmetric prop effect, prop-wash, asymmetric ground resistance, wind, slope, gyroscopic effects, control asymmetry, and of course pilot input! These are just a few of the significant ones but remember, they can combine in any number of ways to produce numerous effects. The only thing you know for sure is that it WILL swing at some point.

2.   The earlier you respond, the more instantaneously your input will take effect, requiring much smaller inputs and therefore, much fewer counter inputs. Over-controlling is one of your biggest enemies and becomes more likely as your inputs increase in magnitude and duration. Remember, if you’ve put in a large boot full one way, the chances are that it’ll take some time to be fully felt, by which time you’re focussed on the next movement. Then, it’ll be too late and it’ll get you! If you’re on top of it, there should be no need to make anything other than very small, very short inputs.

3.   Some swinging tendencies ARE predictable. Use this to your advantage! If you can remember how increasing power makes the aircraft respond, you should be countering that motion in anticipation and stopping it before it happens. Similarly, experiment with setting the rudder trim to lessen the effect of whatever is causing the most significant swing at the beginning of your roll.

4.   Primary causal factors vary according to ground and airspeed. For example, the gyroscopic effect of raising the tail during take-off, or lowering it during the landing roll, will be more pronounced at lower airspeeds because you have less aerodynamic control authority. Similarly, increasing the power causes torque effects which in turn cause a swinging moment. However, with increased power comes increased slipstream effect from the prop and therefore, greater rudder authority to deal with it. DCS models this effect very well. My advice here is to be confident with the application of take-off power. The key is to get take-off power set promptly but as importantly, smoothly. Again, use your experience to preempt the effects before they cause problems. Do everything SMOOTHLY and CALMLY.

5.   The left swinging effect of engine torque and the ground interaction as a result can be countered with the application of right aileron during the take-off roll. However, you must be proficient at modulating this input as aileron authority increases with airspeed. Failure to do so will only result in a swing and/or roll in the opposite direction, which you may not be expecting. Overall, that may add to your problems rather than helping, so experiment with applying right aileron and holding it prior to starting the ground roll, OR starting neutral and feeding in some aileron immediately prior to the torque causing a swing. There’s no right or wrong way here, it’s down to what works for you.

6.   RELAX! It’s a physical fact that when your muscles are tense, you can’t make quick accurate and short inputs. This is a major consideration because the nature of the scenario makes you tense and it’s difficult to counter that! It’s so important though. Before you start your take-off roll, chant a little mantra to yourself… “wake up feet! Wake up feet! Wake up feet!” Do this while doing a little light dance on the rudder pedals. It may sound daft but subconsciously, it will focus a little bit of your brain on the job in hand. It will also help to relax your muscles which have probably already tensed up without you realising it. Do this on final approach to land as well. It helps!

7.   SIT BACK IN YOUR SEAT! When faced with a situation that you perceive as being difficult, your tendency is almost always to lean forward and focus on what’s immediately in front of you, effectively narrowing your field of view. Believe me, I’ve seen pilots almost planting their faces in the panel as workload increases. It’s just what we do but the effect of decreasing your field of view and by definition, your peripheral vision, makes detecting lateral movement very much more difficult. It also has the secondary effect of re-tensioning your muscles, something we want to avoid!
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 15:52:05 by Mikko Kärkkäinen »
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